Visiting Fort Riley
Junction City & Manhattan, Kansas
 

Detailed Fort Riley hours and activity information

Wounded Knee Monument at Fort Riley, Kansas
Wounded Knee Monument - dedicated in 1893
Great War Memorial -  World War One monument
Great War Memorial - erected in 1918

Construction of Fort Riley, near Junction City, Kansas, began in 1853, and its heritage includes George Armstrong Custer and Buffalo Soldiers in the 19th century as well in providing soldiers that have served the united States in every major conflict of the 20th and 21st Centuries. Fort Riley is an active US military base, and recently grew - after many years in Europe the Big Red One returned to Fort Riley.

But Fort Riley has a lot to offer visitors: museums, historic buildings, historical markers, statues and monuments. All in a setting that will sometimes remind you of a campus and at other times of a park. There are even a couple of opportunities for visitor shopping: a gift shop in the U.S. Cavalry Museum Post and a thrift shop in Building 267 on Stuart Avenue, next to the stables,

When visitors arrive at the entrance to Fort Riley, it typically takes about 5 minutes to get a visitor's pass. The army requires photo ID, car registration and proof of insurance. They will inform you of any restrictions to where you may go on the Fort. Only US residents are permitted to tour Fort Riley.

Old Trooper Monument
Old Trooper Monument modeled after the drawing “Old Bill” by Fredric Remington.

Grave of Chief - the US Army's last Cavalry Horse
Grave of Chief - the US Army's last Cavalry Horse
Foaled 1932, entered military service 1940-49, died 1968
In front of Old Trooper Monument

There are two museum buildings housing three museums (U. S. Cavalry Museum, Fort Riley Regimental & Constabulary Museum), and the "Custer" House Museum just a couple of hundred feet away. I put Custer in quotes, because when they picked that house to restore, they got the wrong one. Custer actually lived a few doors down the row.

There have been stories that the "Custer" House is haunted. During the period that the house was believed to have been the one where General Custer had lived, there were reports that the house was haunted by the General. More recently there were sinister stories of a haunted teddy near and rocking horse, but the toys have been moved to the Kansas Museum of History and the incidents have stopped.

U. S. Cavalry Museum
U. S. Cavalry Museum and vehicle display - originally constructed in 1855 for use as a hospital.
 

Rough Rider exhibit in US Cavalry Museum
1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry Regiment (Rough Riders)

M5 Horse Gas Mask
M5 Horse Gas Mask from World War 2

Page 2 and detailed hours and activities Fort Riley official Community Relations

Kansas Attractions  Kansas Travel & Tourism Home

copyright 2005-2011 by Keith Stokes